modular manner

Emma Ewan

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Modular Manner

Plywood, timber, masonry paint, ‘Tudor Oak’ woodstain, red-stained bark

2014

 

Modular Manner is an interactive sculptural jigsaw puzzle. It uses the lineage of the Tudor Black-and-White style as a medium to explore the process of appropriation in architectural styles throughout history, grasping at the basic building blocks that contribute to its maintained visual lineage and addressing the methods, materials and consequences of regenerating historic design. The completed structures are reminiscent of a stage set, with the superficial add-ons of a ‘Mock’ aesthetic echoed in their ultra-flat surfaces. The establishment of the domestic garden for the general public coincided with the beginnings of the ‘Mock Tudor’ style and so Modular Manner has always been shown within the context of a garden, firstly in a communal tenement yard and more recently in the stately grounds of Cockenzie House, East Lothian.